Youth Worker – You’re going to get fired someday.


20140325-205222.jpg

Or they’ll ask you to resign, or something like that. Maybe it will be your fault, maybe not. Most likely it won’t be over one big glaring mistake. And most likely there will be the public story and then there will be the story behind the story. Or maybe not, but people will wonder… “what’s the real reason?” I’ve had several friends lose their ministry jobs this month. Some ended well, some didn’t. Over the past 28 years of youth ministry, I’ve watched a lot of people come and go, and one thing I’ve learned; your job will end someday, and it’s rare when it ends well. The question is: How will you handle it, and what will you do when it does end? I remember when I got fired from my dream job. I had built a youth ministry from scratch at a megachurch.

The new Sr. Pastor took my wife and I out for breakfast one Saturday and out of left field told me I was finished. He used words like “unqualified, ineffective, too old.” I was shell-shocked. Blind-sided.

We’d been there 5 years and had seen phenomenal numerical growth and lots of transformational life change. It made no sense. He would let me resign, but I couldn’t tell anyone for 3 months and I needed to finish out the school year. It was brutal. Years later the man took me out for coffee and apologized, and said he was wrong for firing me. It’s been 14 years, and while I’ve long been over it, I remember it like it was yesterday.

Why does getting fired from a ministry job hurt so much?

Very few jobs are so intimately connected to your heart like a ministry job. Not only does getting fired make you question your work ethic and the quality of your work, but a ministry job is all tied up with your heart and your dreams, even your very relationship with Christ. We pray, we cry, we dream, we plan, we risk, we put everything we have into it. Like the Apostle Paul  we have “poured out our life as a drink offering.” So when it all goes south, its very difficult not to take it personally and feel like we are a failure as well.

As if that wasn’t enough, often times many of your closest friendships are in the church, for both you and your family, and there’s a tearing away, almost like a divorce, as friends decide if they will keep you in their lives or move on.

And then there’s that feeling of betrayal from the leadership, of promises broken, the disillusionment, the loss of innocence and idealism that you once had regarding the Church. At times those same feelings even bleed over into our relationship with God.

“I served you in this thankless job, and this is what I get?”

Here’s what I’d like to tell every Youth Worker to help you survive and to prepare for the day you get “resigned.”

Not to be too pessimistic, but if you go into ministry with correct expectations, it will be easier when you leave.

1. It’s part of the job.

If you’re going to be a pastor, youth pastor, worship leader, children’s pastor etc… getting fired comes with the territory. Like being a professional football coach or something, coaches come and go. You get your shot at building a successful program, but there comes a time when it needs to be someone else’s turn. Coaches usually get too much of the credit when a program wins, and too much of the blame when teams lose. Don’t take it personally. It’s part of the gig. It’s rare when the coach goes out on top to fanfare and celebration.

2. Take the high road. Always.

Don’t engage in finger pointing, in lashing out, in defending yourself. Don’t post something scathing online. Doing so never does what you hope it will, in fact, it does exactly the opposite. It diminishes you and your character. You are above that. Leave with class. If there’s judgement to be meted out, if there’s truth to be told, it’s not yours to deliver. Leave it to the sole Arbiter of Truth.

3. Learn the nugget of truth in your firing.

While the bulk of the reasons you got let go may not have merit, there is likely some core truth the Lord is trying to bring to your attention. It would be a huge mistake not to take full advantage of this teachable moment in your life. And when you’re good and ready, ask The Lord to show you what He’s trying to teach you. And if you can’t hear it from Him, ask your spouse or a really good friend!

4. Let the rest roll… like water off a duck’s back.

Take the core truth in, but let the rest of what’s being said bead up and roll off you. Do not absorb the rest of that polluted water into your being. Everything being said in this storm is not true or beneficial. Take the nugget and let the rest roll.

5. Refuse to get bitter.

Satan will lie to you and try to plant that bitter seed deep down in your soul where it will fester and grow. I did not want to be that guy who spat vile whenever the conversation touched that topic in the future. I refused to let Satan diminish the eternal work that was done while I was the youth pastor there. But refusing to get bitter is not a one time decision. Those bitter thoughts come daily, even hourly at first. Over and over you will have to make a conscious choice to not take in that bitter seed. Spit it out, every time. Lastly, don’t let it negatively impact your relationship with God or let it sour you on the local church. You work for Jesus, not for people. We are called to serve them whether they appreciate it or not. And in some sense, when you suffer pain at the hands of the Church, you are sharing in the sufferings of Christ. Like the Apostles, Luther, Bonhoeffer, Yaconelli… who all suffered abuse at the hands of the church. You are in good company.

Both of our sons have talked about going into full time ministry someday. They have had a front row seat to both the good and the bad in the church world. They’ve watched their dad have both success and failure, been treated well and mistreated. And they’ll serve anyway. And that’s my hope for you.

I know this. It always ends. And it very rarely ends well. Shake off the dust and serve anyway.

We are not looking for “Well done good and faithful” from their lips, but His.

~M

Related Post: “Lessons I learned in the backwash of being fired.”

%d bloggers like this: